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Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 5:00pm EST
governance project, which challenges philadelphia sovereignty. and then we'll move to action and look at the actual activities. fourth, will examine the significance of this conflict between constitutional government and global governance. sovereignty is defending the scholars scholars than most people as westphalian, embodied in the nation state is going the treaty of 1648 and that's true to an extent. when i was working on the book and thinking of coming up with concepts, i relist americans don't think of themselves as westphalian sovereignty. we the people of the united states of america. opening words of the constitution, written in philadelphia, hence philadelphia sovereignty. but what is philadelphia sovereignty, the people are sovereign, the three constitution and the core of the twin pillars of our liberty and consent. so we do have majority rule, but majority rule is limited reconstitution and the whole system of separation of powers, federalism and limited government. a lot of times people get hung up in the republic or democracy. wary compound machine, a regime that is both
CSPAN
Jan 19, 2013 9:30pm EST
assume that the national government must at all costs remain support of the four slave states within the union. those in light blue. so called loyal border states, delaware, missouri, maryland and especially kentucky top do that, he believed, the republicans must not an antagonize those states politically powerful slave holders. antagonize them by interfering with slavery in the succeeding states at least not interfering with them anymore than necessary. lincoln was sure that if he did otherwise the slave holders would pick up and leave as well. second lincoln assumes that only a small minority in the succeeding states really support succession. he and other republicans believe that the great majority of white southerners in the confederacy. slave holders and nonslave holders alike. loyal abiding citizens who had been tricked in to suck us is suggestion by a minority of extremists. leaving slavery alone would hopefully, win them back in to the union. that is the expectations. but after a full year of war, and despite lincoln's efforts to spare their property and feelings, precious fe
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 8:30pm EST
nation's history, it was the states rather than federal government that controlled access to religious worship, the rights of religious organizations and so on. and in the early decades of the 20th century, that began to shift as the supreme court applied the national constitutional establishment and free exercise clauses of the first amendment against the states sort of centralizing debates about religion. >> host: but if the states had the control, we had it written into our constitution, freedom of religion. >> guest: we did, indeed. but the first amendment begins "congress shall enact no law." so it was addressed only to the national government. >> host: were there restrictions by different states on religion? >> guest: oh, yes, there were. several states had religious establishments. most states limited the amount of property a religious organization could own. some taxed religious property. others banned given groups' practices. i'm thinking, for example, eventually various states in the southwest banning polygamy, for example. >> host: so when it came to massachusetts, talk abou
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 7:30am EST
is to increase the size of government. but nevertheless, they were second strings, if you will. hayek, contemporary of chambers and russell kirk as well, we were represented the other two strands of it. but until the '70s probably, communism was the dominant thing. something i have wondered about was when ronald reagan was elected, whether as you look at the history of the conservative movement, anti-communism became much less of a deal. and i wonder if with ronald reagan the people who were anti-communist don't deny this anti-communist in charge who was the commander in chief and they felt comfortable enough leading anti-communism so they did need to put the same amount of emphasis into it that they had and focused on other things. anyway, so let's turn for a few minutes to where the movement is today after at the communism. and, of course, we've had what, 20, 25 years since communism to figure out where the conservative movement goes. but there are certainly, i think some things that are different but a great many things are the same to basically the tenets of conservatism are the s
CSPAN
Jan 19, 2013 4:45pm EST
many deaths and fueled much profit, how they make their way into the u.s. and what the u.s. government's role has been in insuring they come into this country and this evening we are pleased to be joined by two drug policy experts as well. san ho tree and, though -- ca e carletta anhgo. i want to hand it over to the panel. [applause] >> thank you so much for coming out here. i just came in from new york. great to be here. i am going to start by talking about my book and then go into -- which focuses on coca and coca policy and how that is relevant especially this week with what is going on at the un and the history of the tree that prohibits coca around world. my book started as a children's book. it started as a follow-up to a children's book about marijuana in 2004-2005. it wasn't a book about teaching kids how to smoke weed. it was uneducated -- it occasional book about how to talk to your kids about the cult subject that they might run into. that is why the format is like an illustrated picture book for kids that as i got deeper into the subject and started looking into coca which
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 7:15pm EST
ought to cancel this because it's never going to work. here's how an efficient government is. this last week we spend another hundred million dollars before they canceled it. they paid a settlement fee of $8 million. but two things didn't happen. the person responsible didn't get fired and wasn't held accountable in the company that didn't provide the service didn't get sued to get our money back, taxpayers of the country. nobody runs their household that way. the state government don't operate that way, but we are totally incompetent when it comes to spending america's taxpayer money. why would we continue to a $32 billion a year on i.t. programs that don't work for the federal government. but 60% of what they take out of the pentagon and that's governmentwide. why would we do that? were going to have a special senate committee to look at this, oversight, look at bad actors in government and demand the people get fired in the company is not performing pay the money back. none of that happens. so you can defraud the federal government. you can do it with impunity and that's because memb
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 10:00am EST
their individual wealth and privileges to cooperate fully with the confederate government struggling to protect the interests of slave owners as a whole. and those are aspects of the book that i'm discussing with you today. but this evening i'd like to talk to you about the most important fissure that ran through the house of dixie, slavery, and the three ways slavery figured in the origin and the progress of the o civil war. first of all, the war's central cause. secondly, as a crucial source of military power deployed during that war. and, third, slavery's erosion during the war and its destruction both of those things as an eventual union goal. the destruction of slavery as an eventual conscious, deliberate union goal. so let's start with cause. as you may know, in a recent national survey half of all those people, half of all those americans when were polled deny that slavery was the main cause of the u.s. civil war. and that view is apparently gaining ground, not losing ground. because among younger people polled, those below 30 years of age, fully three out of five denied slavery's centra
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 6:30am EST
supporter of the royal government and was driven out of town. >> on the other side of that, with now is so a different source of media we can to fact check them how often direct lies in order to gain support or to turn people directly to one side or the other? >> well, i mean, you are definitely finding exaggerations, whether it was drastic or not, what i was interested in finding was that a lot of newspaper accounts came with disclaimers pics of the publishers, these printers very much valued reliable sources. and if the source was questionable, they would frequently print that with the article from some sort of disclaimer. >> i remember there was a letter that was published after the battle of lexington and concord that talks about the british soldiers coming to the parsonage in lexington and rampaging through and killing the barnyard animals. that never happened. there's a letter about the battle of bunker hill that says that general howe, as soon as the soldiers reached charlestown can seldom try tried to desert and run away, and he had to them strung up immediately on greasy. that did
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 7:30pm EST
's the author of this book, "the spirit of compromise: why governing demands it and campaigning undermines it." president gutmann, are we a politically compromised? >> guest: we were created in compromise. a lot of people think of the revolutionary war, which separated us from our mother country. but if you recall -- i know you weren't there then, but if you recall historically speaking our founding fathers crafted a compromise that created the constitution. they were as polarized as any set of americans have been throughout our country and our history. they were pro-and anti-slavery and the compromise. so yes, we were founded in compromise, that today compromises become more difficult than ever before. >> host: what do you mean when you talk about the uncompromising mindset? >> guest: we live in an era characterized as a permanent campaign, where everyday is election day in campaigning and election may make for uncompromising minds. you stand in your principles, mobilize your base, drawing endless amounts of money. 20 for seven new site will cover his politics is that it's a horserace and th
CSPAN
Jan 22, 2013 7:00am EST
a hundred libraries in the country. as a nonprofit kind of cooperative effort, with the government and with institutions of governance, which libraries are, throughout the country. so there is a lot of cooperative effort that those take place. in the are a lot of digitals that come to mind. my favorite example is, comes from czarnecki see who wrote reading alito in tehran. she says when she speaks to her students she would say in tehran, you name an american president in the 19th century. and very few could, but one or two might sick wasn't lincoln in the 19th century? and then she says, can you name an american literary figure. all hands raise, and they say mark twain. and so who has the bigger impact in the world? is it a literary figure or is it a political figure? very interesting. we think politics as a society often, when really literature is the power driving figured. >> [inaudible] is advertising. i have always resisted putting advertising in the random house books. whether it be for real pharmaceutical, and yet when you take something like ian fleming novels, james bond, w
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 3:00pm EST
to pay attention, not just local people but the federal government. it would write letters, do all kinds. no one would pay any attention. the sole rights commission decided that first year it would go out and listen to these people and see what they had to say. they had the power to subpoena anyone. eisenhower said, the reason why i want to get it passed by congress instead of issuing an executive order is because by attorney general tells me that is the only way they can subpoena anybody. given what the problems are, some people may not want to come to testify. so the commission most important power of subpoena. they went and looked all over the place to see what the problems or. they made recommendations that were controversial but seemed to make sense. so after they had been there for a while it was clear they need to be reauthorize to needed to be continued to work on these issues. then of course bell rock crisis and those civil-rights movement started to heat up. it was clear that there was a need. in the commission spent the next few years figuring out what to recommend to the gove
CSPAN
Jan 19, 2013 10:30am EST
franco. in those days spain had lots of fascists around, not just the government. this was a fascist and even nazis in exile were living in madrid. my next-door neighbor was a romanian nazi. we didn't speak for four years. and also there were lots of people living in madrid then who loved spanish culture as i do. at one point i call this a love letter to spain and it is. i would seek one dimming go corona walking around in my neighborhood, juan domongo pe o perro perrone. when i would see real nazis that was something else. i went to a party. i was invited by the spanish government to go to a party at his place and since he was a guy i worked with in cultural affairs i went to the party and walked in the door in the immediately spotted two people. i couldn't believe it. on one end of the room was a bug gardner who lived in spain and on the other end of the room was otto scored zany --scorzene the guy had their call his favorites folder, he was the leader of the attack on this mountaintop with gliders, partisans in italy who captured mussolini, not sure what to do in 43, and he led t
CSPAN
Jan 19, 2013 8:00pm EST
of the american people and to govern the. "national review" as a very intellectual magazine throughout its existence and i think probably even more so in its early years in the 50s and 60's. a very much needed i think bill buckley managing editor and every other major person there acknowledge to that they very much needed a man just like bill rusher to serve as a lyrical eyes and ears, as a political counselor, as a link between "national review" type people. as rusher tended to put it, the intellectuals and the practical politician. by politicians rusher didn't mean people aspired to public office but the mastermind of the goldwater campaign and the marshal of the goldwater campaign. white too was a politician and rusher was something of a politician. in other words if practitioner of actual politics. russia placed tremendous value on these people, and he was always trying with some success to get the more philosophical conservatives. a classic example of course being buckley himself to appreciate that sort of career and that sort of individual and that sort of effort. a lot of what you'l
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 11:15am EST
johnson readily be barry goldwater and richard nixon overwhelming george mcgovern. in each of those elections, one of the candidates failed to capture the spirit of the american voting public. and the winner had the advantage of the weak opponent. franklin roosevelt won his second term, landslide, because of his huge popularity. however, in many more presidential elections, the candidates are in a heated battle to present themselves as the one best capable of serving the country with the winner walking off with the modest majority. it is a customary wisdom that the campaign between the incumbent president and his opponent will be either a referendum on the first term of the president, or a judgment of which candidate will be the better leader. is there really a difference between these two considerations? does not boil down to judging the leadership skill of the incumbent based on his effectiveness during his first term, versus the unknown leadership skills of the challenger? it's easy to point to the national security, or the economic consequences, or consequent impact on the ratin
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 1:25am EST
governments have to operate we have no idea where we get the money over the next 75 years. $88 trillion. that is one point* $05 trillion of bills coming due than we have. if you did not grow the economy at all, a white reporter self in that position? the fed has increased its balance sheet they printed $2 trillion worth of phony many and ultimately the pain will fall on the middle-class and the very core. it is the most -- both parties say they want even if it means we lose our seat reporters cells first instead of the country. it is not hard any citizen if they read back in black there is common-sense ways to save money. just this last week the air force announced this year we spend $64 billion on miti projects 64 billion said gao says half of that will be wasted. it will never be completed. and back in black the city ought to cancel this because it will never work. this is out inefficient government is. finally the air force canceled the spent another 100 million first. they paid the settlement fee to cancel of $8 million. but the person responsible did not get fired and not held acco
CSPAN
Jan 19, 2013 7:00pm EST
farms are suffering and they rely on these government programs is a critical safety net. we don't want to throw the baby with the bathwater, as my mother used to say. after accounting for all the cost of farming, small and medium farmers met just over $19,000 a year. that is from the usda's statistics. the government programs make up nearly half of that amount. other earnings make up the rest of the household income. the income of a full-time farmers is 19% below the u.s. average. foreign income is not keeping up with the cost using crops, even though the price for corn and soybeans is higher since 2007. the cost of food is a very good example. i am sure you all know these are companies like monsanto and the prices have skyrocketed. corn feed prices rose 33% for fiscal crisis and soybeans are up 24%. also the cost of fuel and fertilizer and other important farming ventures, not to mention the bad weather and drought. small and midsize farms operate at a very slim margin. and if the subsidy program is eliminated without creating a fair market, that farmers can sell into, we are going to
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 11:15am EST
, is a stokely carmichael and huey newton and timothy leary went to war against the united states government and one. [laughter] that's just how important -- impossible it seemed when it all began. >> mr. standiford, of the american colonies, who in your opinion was most radical in terms of methods? >> who was most radical? well, certainly in his passion, in its desperate passion and in his ability to convey it and his ability to rally troops, or supporters, it was a sam adams. i believe that if it had not been for sam adams, would we have -- people always are fond of asking this question. did the sons of liberty really bring us, create a revolution? my answer is yes. history shows it. would there have been a revolution had these men not done what they did as they did at the time they did? maybe. when, we don't know. it would have been the leaders of the battles, we can't be sure. and how -- some say we could have ended up like canada. yes, we would have probably broken away from great britain, but in the way that canada did. there's speculation along those lines. the other interesting thing
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 8:00am EST
from outside the united states coming here including many senior government officials from outside the country. they want to toe what's going on -- they want to know what's going on in the innovation. we're the host and we're also a growing, important industry that is making a difference in the future. when you're talking about raising revenue or cutting spending innovation is the answer. innovation is growth, and we have to make sure our government does not hurt innovation. and sometimes they come awfully close. last year we were talking about pipa and sopa, a law rushing through congress because the copper lobby is so strong which would have allowed, basically anyone in the world to shut down any internet web site. and thank god that was stopped. and it was stopped in part because it started here with members of congress holding a press conference saying this must be stopped. innovation is too important consumer access to the internet is too important, we have to do something about it. and now that sopa and pipa is dead, it's like name your kid adam. no one will do it ever again.
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 8:00pm EST
government officials from outside the country. they want to know what's going on with innovation. we are the host and we are phenomenally dynamic growing important industry making a difference in the future. when you're talking about raising revenue or raising taxes or cutting spending innovation is the answer. innovation is growth and we have to make sure our government does not hurt them . we were talking here about hipaa and sopa about the law of rushing through congress because the lobbyists is so strong that would allow anyone in the world to shut down any internet web site by claiming copyright infringement and thank god that was. was stopped because it started here with members of congress holding a press conference saying this must be stopped. innovation is too important in consumer access to the internet is to import and we have to do some ring about. we will never have legislation like that again in congress. it's like name your kid adolf. no one will ever do it again. >> host: gary shapiro do you have an opinion on who you would like to replace julius genachowski at the f
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 11:15pm EST
with the perennial conflict between the executive and legislative branches of government. most presidents will extend their exclusive hands of authority to the utmost, congress on the other hand generally seeks to limit, the president's freedom of action. is understood, however, time to time setting such limit may be needed. fourth, the president of servers embrace. of invincibility, of hubris which icons the president to lose touch with political realities. five, the president must exercise influence over and effectively communicate with the nations whose able to communicate persuasively. six, the majority of american people must believe in the president's integrity and sustain a substantial level of pride and the president throughout the eight years in office, despite specific shortcomings he must have strengthened the nation on alan by his actions. the president must lead a legacy for the nation. the list of those failed in their second term includes george washington, james madison, andrew jackson, theodore roosevelt, dwight eisenhower, ronald reagan and bill clinton. the game is a special case i
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 2:00pm EST
and conservative intellectuals to remain focused on the need to win a majority of the american people and to govern. "national review," as a very intellectual magazine throughout its existence -- and i think probably even more so in its early years, the '50s and '60s -- very much needed, i think, bill buckley, managing editor priscilla buckley and every other major person there acknowledged that they very much needed a man just like bill rusher to serve as a political eyes and ears, as a political counselor, as a link between "national review"-type people. as rusher tended to put it to me, the intellectuals and the practical politicians. by politicians rusher didn't just mean people if or aspiring to public office, but people like his good friend f. clifton white, the master mind of the draft-goldwater campaign. white, too, was a politician, and rusher was something of a politician. in other words, a practitioner of actual politics. rusher placed tremendous value on these people. and he was always trying, you know, with some success to get the more philosophical conservatives. a classic example, of
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 10:00pm EST
and long before the earthquake for a system for potable water to be maintained and government institutions to be supportive to be capable to do that kind of thing valid eliminate a major part of the crisis. and that could help to ameliorate of present crisis like the cholera epidemic. and other crisis of the future. drinking this may make me a hypocrite but that is part of my character, as you will read in the book. >> the phone was next to me on the bet not ringing. this is difficult. a slow january afternoon in the hills above port-au-prince and the time before christmas and cornball was a distraction. why alone housemates the photographer was at home my a main translator was translating phone calls before heading down to a family's house for he had been living since his divorce. a haitian mechanic was replacing the brake pads on may 13 year-old jew tracker. the call was from someone telling me i could ship out. after two and a half years of disasters and riots, many pet cars nonutility i could count on i was done with haiti. my friends are great the house was terrific wins set back agai
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 1:00pm EST
by the demonstrations in birmingham, which revealed the police dogs dogs and the fire h. suddenly the government had to act. the first great accomplishment of lynn johnson son, that not much attention is given to, is the magnificent way he assumed the presidency. this was a nation in crisis. we had a cold war going on. in which the -- there was huge fear of russian missiles heading our way. our president had been killed. we didn't know whether it was the russians who had kill him or castro or -- it was great, great uncertainty. and johnson came to that job, reassured the nation, took the reins of government, and during that first year, he was president, passed the historic 1964 civil rights act, which outlawed official segregation in the south, made employment discrimination a crime. it was a very, very -- probably the most important advance since lincoln signed the emancipation proclaimation, and during that year, if johnson was mr. inside, and some outside, because he gave some inspirational speeches -- king kept the pressure on. whenever he thought that the congress was going to falter, that they
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 3:00pm EST
the fact that small and mid sized farms are suffering and that they rely on these government programs as a critical safety net. we sure don't want to throw out the baby as the bath water, with the bath water as my mother used to say. so after accounting for all the costs of farming, small and medium farms net just over $19,000 a year. that's from the usda's most recent statistics. the government programs make up nearly half of that amount, and earnings from all farm jobs make up the rest of the household's income. the income of these full-time farmers is 19% below the u.s. average. farm income isn't keeping up with the cost of producing crops even though the price for corn and soy is higher since 2007. the ever-inflating cost of seeds is a really good example. a few -- i'm sure you all know that a few may or -- major chemical and pharmaceutical giants dominate the industry, and the prices have skyrocketed. corn seed prices rose 32% since the fiscal crisis, and soybean seeds are up 24%. also the cost of fuel, fertilizer, feed and other imports make farming pretty expensive venture not
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 11:00pm EST
of the american people and to govern. "national review" as a magazine for about its existence, and probably even more so in its years in the 50's and 60's very much needed bill buckley managing editor priscilla and every other major person there acknowledged they very much need a man like bill rusher to serve as a political ideas and the years as a political counselor, has a link between "national review" type of people as he tended to put it the intellectuals and the practical politicians come he didn't just mean people aspiring to public office, but people like his good friend the mastermind of the campaign and the wall marshall of the campaign. he too was a politician and rusher was somewhat of a practitioner of actual politics. he placed a tremendous value on these people, and he was always trying with some success to get the more philosophical conservatives a classic example of course being buckley himself to appreciate that sort of career, that serve individual and that sort of effort. a lot of what you'll find in the book and i sure some of you have read it is a good deal of back-and-fort
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 8:45am EST
philanthropists, big foundatio foundations, often the same thing, large institutions, corporations and government get together, they hire ceos for cities and the how can we attract corporations away from other cities, or away from her own suburbs which these days is a much bigger issue. .. i lectured to karros organization, and afterward she came up at my god, that needs to be about. i said that sounds familiar and that started the process. i don't do this anywhere else. because when the bookstore that you talk about the making of the object, which is important. like suburban nation, i then took four years and read everything because i knew a certain amount of stuff, but in planning there so many great best practices scattered all over the place. in order to present this book, i have to share with you if the people i got great stuff with. this is that going to be of long lists of things, but the guy who's got parking entirely figured out has written a 732 page 12-pound work called the high cost of free parking. this one chapter in this book. chris weinberger workings has written amazing book call
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 6:00pm EST
and if they had their way to get of their role in the government sheet known stevens in congress they served together and they were fellow whigs and he respected him at one point you have to consider the apple of gold and the frame of silver good question about the security, lincoln had a habit of writing private and confidential all these letters that we've been talking about and we expected that -- i guess he expected the gentleman to keep the material out of the newspapers but he never wrote anything that wouldn't -- would get him into trouble because he did expect that men like stevens would show his letter pro union southerners and they would show the confidential notice so he never wrote anything, she never let himself down in this correspondence because i think he felt that there was a danger even if they adopted this gentleman code in terms of confidentiality. lyndon felt buchanan peace and the and worsen the crisis by not standing up to south carolina and louisiana when others confiscated the federal property in those states. he had no respect for buchanan but he got angry quickly a
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 10:15pm EST
will gradually become more and more except of old. i guess i have to jump here. invisible government is his and that secret on between government and he has malefactors of great will and he has got great white fleet which is what he dubs the group that would go around the world. nature of fakers is his. research reading some of these nature writers who are tribute in a phenomenal powers of animals. of the wolves and the hu e. pioneer children out of the woods from starvation and animals from biblical precision. and of course he comes up with this term nature of fakers and crusades against seton thompson who was one of the major fakers. one of my favorites which i actually -- improve this before he died a lot of this stuff is deeply involved with sapphire. i did a lot of research on some of these terms including mulligan and i will come back to that in the second. but the term that teddy roosevelt which was loose canon not in the nautical sense of the canon on it carriage floating around on the deck of a ship but the loose canon being the erratic, the person out of control, the person who
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 10:15am EST
fringe that takes over and destroys. roosevelt has got, um, he's got invisible government is his, a secret bond between government and business. he's got malefactors of great wealth. he's got great white fleet which is what he dubs the group, the fleet that'll go around the world. nature fakers is his. he starts reading some of these nature writers who are attributing a phenomenal powers to animals, you know, wolves who lead pioneer children out of the woods from starvation and animals with codes of of behavior and animals which act with biblical precision. and, of course, he comes up with this term nature fakers and he crusades against them. earnest thompson is one of the nature fakers, and he goes after him. the -- one of my favorites which is, actually, william sapphire is the one who proved this before he died was, who a lot of this stuff is, of course, deeply involved with of sapphire, and i did some, a lot of research for sapphire and some of these terms including mulligan with eisenhower. i'll come back to that in a second. but the term that teddy roosevelt which was loose
CSPAN
Jan 19, 2013 3:00pm EST
that the sending of it and there is a movement of transit takes over. roosevelt got invisible government, he has enough factors under his belt, he has great lakes fleet, which is what he does around the world and it attributes a phenomenal power to pioneer children all over the world and animals with codes of behavior and act from biblical precision. of course, he comes with this term and crusades against them. one of my favorites is william safire, a lot of this stuff is deeply involved. and i did a lot of research with some of these terms. the term that teddy roosevelt used was loose cannon. noncanonical sense of a cannon, but meaning the erratic, a person out of control. the person who was a loose cannon. so you can go on with teddy roosevelt, through the book, the other one is good to the last drop. which was the famous maxwell house saying, and he says oh, it's good to the last shot. before you know it, they have a national brand using teddy roosevelt's slogan. maybe the first and only president to have an advertising slogan. so i figure the next question that everyone wants to know is how
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 1:25pm EST
from the federal government to build military installations at a time when the united states was involved in the cold war against the soviet union. so, states like mississippi, states like georgia and texas and florida and southern california and arizona, north carolina, are all being transformed in the post world war ii period by this historic shift in population and political influence. just think about it. this real -- this period from 1964 to 2008 could be thought of as kind of the period of the sun belt dominance in american presidential history. you think about every president elected from 1964 to 2008 comes from a state of the sun belt, lyndon johnson, texas. richmond nixon, california. gerald ford, was not elected. so he doesn't count. he was from michigan. jimmy carter from georgia. ronald reagan from california. the first george bush from texas via connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas and the second bush from texas. so 2008 in some ways watershed election. ends the 40-year period of sun belt dominance. and there were issues that were critical in the politics that
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 6:30pm EST
was from st. louis, which got the government to build a big gateway arch and started calling itself the gateway to the west before that they were known as mound city, which always drew the question, mound of what? [laughter] so you can't blame them, really. although we don't think it as the gateway of the as west. we think of if it as the exit from the east. [laughter] there's some similarities between tsl elliot and me. we both use foreign language in our poetry. he tends to use san san crypt. i don't use much of that. i actually don't know much of that language. i was one of the kids that got dreaming during the sanskrit class in kansas city. [laughter] look out the window. i use yiddish though. [laughter] i think it's fair to say that tsl elliot was not partial to yiddish. i -- my shortest poem uses yiddish. my shortest poem was called something like "the societal, political, and philosophical implications of the o.j. simpson trial ." the title doesn't count in the length. and y. oey vey. [laughter] and also when yugoslavia started to break up, i did a poem that said cro asians w
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 4:00pm EST
developed his governing strategy and his electoral strategy, and it really culminated in november. so this is the back story to what happened in this presidential campaign. .. these books were written out of desperation. i was having a drink with a grad student, and we were reflecting on how we struggled in some of our economics and stats classes. now naked economics" was wherein almost by accident in the sense i had been assigned a class to teen economics to journalists. i was unsuccessfully trying to sell a book on the gambling industry. never got that done. there's a good book to be written. i said to her, i got to teach this economics class to bunch of journalists. a textbook would be inappropriate. i can't find anything that would convey why they should care about this. there was a long pause, and she said, no, you're going to write it, and it's going to be called economics for poets, and i'm going to read it. so that's how naked economics was born, once that found a niche among people who had been scared away or bored to death by economics classes, we said -- we being debby nort
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 2:00pm EST
you're own government telling you to commit suicide, which is -- c-span: with the fbi recess? >> guest: absolutely. absolutely. in a higher political regions. see, i think there's a very -- i have some fbi characters in here that our heroes, but most people -- c-span: like? give me a -- >> guest: like joe sullivan. the man who sold several of the cases down in st. augustine, florida, which is one of the unsung stories of the period. and then he went over to mississippi. he was the model for inspector erskine, and the long-running fbi series. he was a no-nonsense copper. and like most fbi agents, they don't go in there with an envisioned to do political work, which means listening to your phones and planning propaganda and going around calling into people's private lives. they doing to solve cases. so you have a delicious or a painful conflict running in this era. you have the most spectacular political misuse of the fbi going on at the same time the fbi is trying to solve new kinds of crime and confronting the plan down in the south at the time when they were almost at will committing
CSPAN
Jan 19, 2013 9:00am EST
government. in invisible armies:an epic history of guerrilla warfare from ancient times to the present, military historian max boot's provides a comprehensive history of unconventional warfare. andrea stewart uses her family
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 8:30am EST
of his movements within the government in nairobi, over the ensuing decades, was filled with political intrigue and frustration. and after just doing five days of interviews in kenya, three in nairobi and to out here, my mind is spinning with all the intrigues that i've heard. i have heard one story after another of the manipulations and death threats, and people losing their jobs because of tribalism, of some other sort of move for power. and barack obama unavoidably was caught up in that. spent another 10 that is come up is alcoholic. >> i think that barack obama, sr. definitely had a drinking problem. many of the people that i've interviewed have called an outright and alcoholic. some of his family members who were reluctant to go that far just say he drank a lot. but he certainly, there were a lot of occasions where, many of the people i interviewed said that he loved his double bubble. a double with double scotch, and would drink at any hour of the day, and that it really didn't affect his life. they attributed in part to just, you know, and alcoholic is a generic thing, but also
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 8:30pm EST
in the government in nairobi in the ensuing decades filled with political frustrations. after just doing five days of interviews in kenya, three in nairobi and two of them out here my mind is spinning with all of the intrigue that i've heard. it's just one story after another of the manipulation and the death threats and people losing their jobs because of tribalism or some. he was caught up in that. >> host: is that a term that has come up? >> guest: i think barack obama, senior differently had a drinking problem. many of the people i interviewed they wouldn't go that far they would just say he drank a lot. but there were a lot of locations where many of the people i've interviewed said that he loved his double double, double whiskey, a double scotch, and they really did affect his life and they attributed to an alcoholic as a general thing but because of his family and employment ups and downs it exaggerated its. i think the word womanizer actually is used in kenya and the same way that it is in the united states partly because much of kenya is a polygamist culture. from where he came as part of
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 2:05am EST
needing -- cuban revolution like the israeli government formed in 1948, urgently needing to defend themselves. the israelis against all of their neighbors, and the cuban resolution against the united states. the eisenhower administration, and then the kennedy administration, were determined to rid cuba of fidel castro. there was the bay of pigs in april 19611. the kennedy administration humiliated by castro because he won. they resorted to a whole series, years of very elaborate operations and assassination plots to kill fidel castro. jack kennedy did not want to go into re-election in 1964 with fidel castro still in power. >> do you think if jfk had survived, fidel castro would not have survived until 64? >> an interesting question. one of the most interesting personalities i wrote about in the book, a very senior cia officer, fits -- fitzgerald, says if kennedy had lived, castro would still not have been in power by 1964. fitzgerald, behind the most detailed, the most sophisticated assassination plot to kill castro, truly believed that. >> who is renadlod? >> he was a recruited s
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